ABOUT PARTIAL ONSET
SEIZURES IN ADULTS

There are two kinds of seizures. 
Generalized seizures take place across 
both sides of the brain. Partial seizures 
are localized in one part of the brain. 

POSSIBLE CAUSES OF A SEIZURE

What causes a seizure?

Medicines, high fevers, and head injuries can all cause a seizure. But many people with epilepsy have no clear cause to point to. In all cases, the seizures are caused by an abnormal level of electrical activity in the brain.

PARTIAL ONSET SEIZURES ARE DIFFERENT

What are partial onset seizures?

Seizures take place in the brain. They are the result of sudden, abnormal electrical activity. In people with epilepsy, seizures are caused by overactive nerves. A sudden increase in activity in a small part of the brain can cause a partial seizure. To better understand this condition, we need to further define the words that make it up.

PARTIAL

Seizures are localized and occur in one part of the brain

ONSET

Means the start, beginning or arrival of an event, like a seizure

SEIZURES

Seizures take place in the brain. They are the result of sudden, abnormal electrical activity. Many people think of convulsions when they hear the word seizures. But not all seizures cause convulsions. Medicines, high fevers, and head injuries can all cause a seizure. But many people with epilepsy have no clear cause to point to.

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SYMPTOMS OF PARTIAL ONSET SEIZURES

What are the different symptoms of partial onset seizures?

Many people with epilepsy worry that a seizure will happen at any time or place. They may stay home more than they would like for fear of having a seizure in public. Epilepsy symptoms can also make it difficult for a person to work or perform other daily tasks.

There are many different symptoms that come with seizures. Overall, there are 2 kinds of seizures. Generalized seizures, these take place across both sides of the brain. And partial seizures, these are localized in one part of the brain.

There are 2 basic types of partial seizures: simple and complex.

TWO PARTIAL ONSET SEIZURE TYPES

During simple partial seizures,
a person:

  • Stays alert
  • Can answer questions and follow commands
  • Can recall what happened during the seizure

During complex partial seizures,
a person:

  • Loses or has a change in consciousness
  • May not be able to answer questions or follow commands
  • Often cannot recall what happened during part or all of the seizure
DID YOU KNOW

About half of all seizures
are partial seizures,
making them one of the
most common types
of seizures

GETTING A DIAGNOSIS

DIAGNOSING PARTIAL ONSET SEIZURES

If you have partial onset seizures, you know how much it can affect you. Besides the seizures themselves, the unpredictability of when your next seizure will happen can be extremely unnerving and scary. If you think you might have partial onset seizures, talk to your doctor immediately.

If you’ve had a seizure, your doctor will want to know about all the circumstances surrounding the seizure. This is because certain temporary conditions can cause seizures, such as head injury, exposure to certain drugs, a high fever, or abnormal levels of glucose or sodium in the blood. So be sure to tell your doctor about the details surrounding your seizure. Your doctor will also want to know how often these seizures occur.

A few ways your doctor may diagnose partial onset seizures

A complete medical exam and evaluation

When a doctor sets out to diagnose the cause of seizures, he or she follows several steps. To start, doctors will complete a full patient history and then perform a neurological exam. Next a doctor may do a blood test and other clinical tests to rule out other conditions, such as fainting, hypoglycemia, or non-epileptic seizures. Finally, a doctor will determine if the symptoms fit a recognized syndrome.

Tools your doctor may use

A careful exam and a thorough medical history are always the first steps. But many times a doctor may use tools such as an electroencephalograph (EEG). This is a machine that records brain waves. Brain waves during a seizure may show patterns that indicate epilepsy.

A doctor may also order other scans, such as a CT (computerized tomography) scan or an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan, to look for scars or growths on the brain that may cause seizures.

PROPER TREATMENT

Work with your doctor to treat partial onset seizures with an add-on

There are medicines that can help control seizures. But many people who take 1 or even 2 or more of these medicines still have seizures. Once your doctor knows about your symptoms, he or she may suggest an adjunctive (add-on) therapy, such as LYRICA (pregabalin).

LYRICA is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an adjunctive treatment for partial onset seizures in adults with epilepsy.

HOW LYRICA MAY HELP

For some patients,
LYRICA helps treat partial
onset seizures in adults
as an add-on therapy